Can-Am ATV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, we were out wheeling last week in Ontario with the -30 weather and within a few hours my front left (sitting on the quad) brake line somehow snapped/uncrimped itself from the caliper! A few months ago I replaced the shitty canam springs with the HD ones which gave me an inch or two of front lift, not sure if that contributed to this... My question is how do I fix this??



The whole part seems to be 40a $154.99 CAD on the parts diagram. If anybody is familiar with the brakes, can I use non-OEM brake line? Or do I have to buy that $150 line :| Highly unlikely that a branch or rock hit that line in the area we were riding, not sure how this happened and I'm worried about the other side lol.




Thanks guys!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
That blows and I agree.... looks like shotty parts to me. You're in Canada so I would check to see if you can find a Greenline around you. Take the brake lines in that you want replaced and they'll make some up for you that will be a lot better quality and less $$$. Any hydraulic line repair shop should be able to make these for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
That got tore out of there buy the look of it,unless something hooked it...I would jack that bike up until the wheel is off the ground and see if the newly set suspension has caused that hose to be stretched beyond what it should be,it well may be holding the wheel up when the suspension drops into a hole...Better to be sure as you may need to get a longer hose made, same for the other side...Might as well know before you go any further ...Don't mean to be bad news...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Hey guys, we were out wheeling last week in Ontario with the -30 weather and within a few hours my front left (sitting on the quad) brake line somehow snapped/uncrimped itself from the caliper! A few months ago I replaced the shitty canam springs with the HD ones which gave me an inch or two of front lift, not sure if that contributed to this... My question is how do I fix this??



The whole part seems to be 40a $154.99 CAD on the parts diagram. If anybody is familiar with the brakes, can I use non-OEM brake line? Or do I have to buy that $150 line :| Highly unlikely that a branch or rock hit that line in the area we were riding, not sure how this happened and I'm worried about the other side lol.
Thanks guys!!
Timbobzimbob, Never fun.... but to answer your brake line question, you need to determine whether or not you have a European Set-up or Non. I live in America but have the European set-up, if your machine is equipped with the European set-up it's quite simple, replace that individual line as it runs to the right wheel well and attaches to the splitter.

However, if you have the Non-European set-up it is a pressed block unit and you'll have to replace the entire front block. Replacement requires removing all lines to the rear Splitter and it's no fun, not complicated really just time consuming, SALUTE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Unfortunately no green line locations near me :(. I will jack the bike up and check! I just find it weird that it didn't get torn out earlier, as I have been in much worse terrain than last week after the lift.

Timbobzimbob, Never fun.... but to answer your brake line question, you need to determine whether or not you have a European Set-up or Non. I live in America but have the European set-up, if your machine is equipped with the European set-up it's quite simple, replace that individual line as it runs to the right wheel well and attaches to the splitter.

However, if you have the Non-European set-up it is a pressed block unit and you'll have to replace the entire front block. Replacement requires removing all lines to the rear Splitter and it's no fun, not complicated really just time consuming, SALUTE!
Ahh that makes sense, ugggh well at least I know now. Any tips on how to figure out if the bike is European or non? Thanks so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Unfortunately no green line locations near me :(. I will jack the bike up and check! I just find it weird that it didn't get torn out earlier, as I have been in much worse terrain than last week after the lift.

Timbobzimbob, Never fun.... but to answer your brake line question, you need to determine whether or not you have a European Set-up or Non. I live in America but have the European set-up, if your machine is equipped with the European set-up it's quite simple, replace that individual line as it runs to the right wheel well and attaches to the splitter.

However, if you have the Non-European set-up it is a pressed block unit and you'll have to replace the entire front block. Replacement requires removing all lines to the rear Splitter and it's no fun, not complicated really just time consuming, SALUTE!
Ahh that makes sense, ugggh well at least I know now. Any tips on how to figure out if the bike is European or non? Thanks so much.
Timbobzimbob, If you have the European set-up you will have a Splitter located behind the right front wheel-well plastic. Below are three pictures, the first shows what a Splitter looks like (cast part with all the ports), the second picture is where it's located on our 2017 below the winch solenoid, I believe it to be in the same location on yours if you have it, and the third picture shows how a European Set-Up is run. If you have the NON-Euro, both front lines will go up into the chassis below the POD and be hooked to a block with four lines, two to the calipers, one to the rear Splitter, and the last one to the Left Hand Lever, SALUTE!





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Unfortunately no green line locations near me :(. I will jack the bike up and check! I just find it weird that it didn't get torn out earlier, as I have been in much worse terrain than last week after the lift.

Timbobzimbob, Never fun.... but to answer your brake line question, you need to determine whether or not you have a European Set-up or Non. I live in America but have the European set-up, if your machine is equipped with the European set-up it's quite simple, replace that individual line as it runs to the right wheel well and attaches to the splitter.

However, if you have the Non-European set-up it is a pressed block unit and you'll have to replace the entire front block. Replacement requires removing all lines to the rear Splitter and it's no fun, not complicated really just time consuming, SALUTE!
Ahh that makes sense, ugggh well at least I know now. Any tips on how to figure out if the bike is European or non? Thanks so much.
Timbobzimbob, Also....if you need the Non-Euro it's parts number 705601122 which was replaced with, 705601519 Can-Am Lh Front Hose. Non Max Model. $112.48 - 2WheelPros

If you need the Euro left line it's part number 705601124 which was replaced with, 705601520 Can-Am Lh Front Hose. T3 $28.28 - 2WheelPros

Hope this helps, SALUTE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well I determined that I do not have the European setup :'( the local dealer suggested a powersports shop to cut some more durable/flexible line and redo the front brake lines, however the powersports guys didnt seem too interested and recommended a hydraulic line/hose shop to custom make the brake line... (similar to what berick suggested with greenline) I guess my best bet is to fork out the ~$200 and replace it with OEM lines and take everything apart :(

Also... while I was in there I noticed my front diff seal has oil around it... Looks like I'll have to replace the seal? >.<



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
I nicked a hydraulic line on my Kubota this summer. The local farm store only had larger hoses than mine in stock. Thea salesman recommended a hydraulic shop down the road. I was in and out in 15 minutes with a new custom made hose. It was very inexpensive also.
It doesn't hurt to call one and see what they say about a brake line. Probably a lot less expensive than a new OEM one at the dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
Man, thta sucks! However, if it was me, and I planned on keeping the ATV for a long time still, I would upgrade to the european setup. Cost is the only difference, the amount of work will be the same because you have to remove the original assembly to replace it with the new one.

A possible solution is if you can find a place that could crimp a new end on the hose and then add an extension on to go the caliper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Definitely go to a hydraulic shop bud and get your hoses made up for you. They'll use much better materials and it will be substantially less $$$ than what the dealership will charge. Also, if you replace the lines with OEM you will more than likely run into the same problem again in the next cold snap you're out riding in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Awesome, once it warms up a bit I'll take some pictures of everything and bring it to a hydraulic shop and ask them how to go about replacing it (whether I should chop the brake line off at the splitter, etc). Will update the thread once that happens, thanks so much guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Finally got everything done, royal pain in the ass I expected. Whole process took me about 6 hours or so. Had to take the entire airbox off, disconnect throttle body, remove front rack, take plastics off, and replace all the brake lines with the new $160 OEM part. There are helpful instructions with pictures in the service manual.

Spent a few hours researching and calling different shops and hydraulic places for help, nobody was able to help with anything really. You can purchase your own brake lines and flare them, thread them into the calipers etc but have to find out the right threads and size, plus can-am uses banjo bolts to hold the brake lines on.

Not a fun experience, I left some slack up front so hopefully this shit doesn't happen again. Still not sure how it happened, lines must have been very brittle from the cold. While airbox is off I would suggest greasing upper and lower steering bushings, cleaning throttle body, and possibly even doing your valves if you're up to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Timbobzimbob, Never fun.... but to answer your brake line question, you need to determine whether or not you have a European Set-up or Non. I live in America but have the European set-up, if your machine is equipped with the European set-up it's quite simple, replace that individual line as it runs to the right wheel well and attaches to the splitter.

However, if you have the Non-European set-up it is a pressed block unit and you'll have to replace the entire front block. Replacement requires removing all lines to the rear Splitter and it's no fun, not complicated really just time consuming, SALUTE!
Hello Common, I seen your post about the broken Can Am brake lines. I now have a broken brake line for the left front. I don’t have my machine apart yet, but it definitely is leaking where the line is crimped, down by the caliper. I noticed on your old post that you sent some pictures to show which set up a person may have, being the European or non European model. Anyway, for some reason there were no pictures when I tried to open them, could you post some again? Also I live in the states, like you mentioned you do, and you mentioned that you have the European model. I was told that I have the non European model because I live in the states. I’m confused on this one. I called on a brake line for the left front, and the salesman said that I have the non European model, without asking for any other info other than the model and year. I thought maybe he would ask for a vin number, but he didn’t. I have a parts CD now, but am also going to order a service manual CD. Do you think I have the European or non European? Also could you repost pictures on the different types, and where to look for a splice or junction, or whatever it may be called, so I can check my machine before ordering? Also, open for input from others. Thank you to any and all for any input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Lads go to a reputable hydraulic parts dealer. I had lines made up to replace the whole system. All parts where in stock, the caliper connectors where a different angle but still worked. If a line is broke, I can replace one at a time from under the centre console. Independent lines to a four way slicer. They are all heavier stainless braided line.
Cost 30.00 more than oem and much easier to replace without tearing down the whole bike. Had pictures , went for a drink in a creek when phone flipped off the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Yep the brake lines are junk. One of my bosses 2016 570s broke the line right were it is crimped, by the caliper. His other 570 is going to break there also as all of the braiding is broken.

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Cant say its junk after a few years of abuse and riding... how many times could that brake line have been hit or as by the looks of original post it got pulled by packed in snow... should be checking your rides and replacing things when they first show signs of failing

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
In the frozen north up here, breaking thru 2 or 3 inches of fresh ice in the hunt trails every day is what snapped my line
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Lads go to a reputable hydraulic parts dealer. I had lines made up to replace the whole system. All parts where in stock, the caliper connectors where a different angle but still worked. If a line is broke, I can replace one at a time from under the centre console. Independent lines to a four way slicer. They are all heavier stainless braided line.
Cost 30.00 more than oem and much easier to replace without tearing down the whole bike. Had pictures , went for a drink in a creek when phone flipped off the bike.
Are there any videos or write ups out there to help with whatever needs to be disassembled in order to replace the brake lines on my 2013 can am outlander max 1000 G2? Thanks for any input.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top