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Discussion Starter #1
So you are teaching your son, daughter or friend to ride your street legal and license plated Can Am on a secondary road. What are the points you want to mention? Here are some I thought of:

1. Adhere to all traffic laws just like you were driving a car.
2. Ride with your lights on for improved visibility.
3. Signal all turns.
4. Wear a helmet
5. Wear eye protection
6. Ride defensively. Other vehicles may not see you.
7. Never ride recklessly or perform stunts like donuts or wheelies
8. Use that mirror. Pull over when safe to do so if you are holding up traffic.
9. Ride on the right half of the traffic lane unless preparing to make a left turn.

What other items should be included in a driver's ed class for street riding?

David
 

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road riding

heres some good safety advice for the new guys....:th_smiliethumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is good advice. Many of the modern ATVs, especially big bore models, have way more horsepower than the average rider can handle. Peg the throttle and you could easily end up on your rear end, or wrapped around a tree.

As you know Can Am and Polaris have "de-tune" settings that hide all the horsepower when using the "normal" key, not the performance key. It makes the machine easier to handle, easier to trail ride, and easier to get work done around the property.

A 45 horsepower, 800 pound ATV is perfectly adequate for its intended purpose. A 90 horsepower ATV is for thrill riding at an ATV park.

Riding our ATVs on a public secondary road will likely be boring to most folks no matter what the horsepower. Riding responsibly no matter the horsepower of the engine is the reason for the driver's ed.

Riding on public secondary roads does make our machines much more useful.

David
 

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riding on the pavement is just not a wise thing to do.it has little to do with horsepower but the design and characteristics of the machine,i dont know how long you have been riding atv but you will find this out one way or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi scooter69392: I'm very inexperienced and admit it. I have a whopping 6 hours of riding on my Outlander Max, all of it on hard packed "dirt roads" in my neighborhood. The average speed has been around 20 mph with a high of 30 mph. My Outlander feels quite stable at those speeds to this inexperienced rider. I think I could improve that stability with "road" tires having stronger sidewalls.

You have been riding for over 20 years on all sorts of machines!

I am a street legal advocate. Many others are not. Over 20 states have passed some form of street legal ATV riding. We have many mountain roads here in my area that are very scenic, all within 10 miles of my place. I would enjoy a couple of hours riding on them every now and then if it were legal. I could follow all the bicyclists who ride around up here. And I will enjoy a trail ride up in the high country come summer. The ATV trails are quite crowded on weekends. My mountain roads are not.

David
 

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riding on the pavement is just not a wise thing to do.it has little to do with horsepower but the design and characteristics of the machine,i dont know how long you have been riding atv but you will find this out one way or the other.
I would say you're wrong and your inexperience and lack of knowledge should be taken with a ton of salt. This is one of them thing that if you don't know what your talking about you probably shouldn't be talking. There are a lot of people that ride the streets in Utah and Arizona would also disagree with you.
 

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ohhh but i do know what im talking about.
just because your local laws and the place you live says its ok to ride on the road doesn't mean its safe.
check your manual and read the warning stickers that are stuck on your atv from the factory and maybe you will gain some knowledge about road riding.
talk to your insurance company also and ask them what kind of coverage you have if you get in an accident while riding your atv on the road then maybe you will understand what im talking about.
these atvs are not safe on the road no matter how many people are doing it in hickville USA.
 

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ohhh but i do know what im talking about.
just because your local laws and the place you live says its ok to ride on the road doesn't mean its safe.
check your manual and read the warning stickers that are stuck on your atv from the factory and maybe you will gain some knowledge about road riding.
talk to your insurance company also and ask them what kind of coverage you have if you get in an accident while riding your atv on the road then maybe you will understand what im talking about.
these atvs are not safe on the road no matter how many people are doing it in hickville USA.
I have full coverage on my ATV to ride on the road $20 a month.
So what do the warning stickers mean? Companies put warning stickers on everything to cover themselves from liability more then anything. I have pistol manuals that say not to shoot reloads or lead bullets in the firearm, doesn't mean the firearm can't shoot reloads or lead bullets it just means that the company said not to so there off the hook if you do and blow up your firearm.
So like I said if you're basing your opinion off warning stickers on the ATV then you don't really know what your talking about.
Ogden Utah is far from hicksville USA and considering that Arizona is populated with a large amount of snowbirds this time of year from all over the country from every walk of life I would say that there is very few hicksvillish types there as well so once again are you talking fact or fiction?

What you fail to understand is I have at least 500 street miles on my ATV and not just back residential roads but high traffic roads running 50 MPH right alongside of other autos in some heavy traffic much of it on 4 lane undivided highway so I have been out there doing it.

Now you're going to say well eventually it will get ya and your right if you do something long enough eventually it will get you, heck just the over day I tripped and fell up the stairs. In town riding at speeds under 50 miles an hour an ATV is no more dangerous or safer then riding a motorcycle.
 

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I will add that how your ATV is outfitted makes a big difference on pavement riding and the main concern would be tires. Big heavy mud tires are not recommended for pavement riding as they adversely affect handling and stability on hard surfaces but for short distances and slow speed one can cross pavement with no problems. Pavement also wears mud tires fast so it's best to keep them off the hard stuff anyway.

There are a few in between tires that work well on pavement as well off, they arn't mud slingers but do fine in the sloppy stuff, this is what I run.

For the hard core pavement running guys are putting a set of car all season radials on there ATV's, tire life is outstanding and the ATV handles very well.
 

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What you fail to understand is I have at least 500 street miles on my ATV and not just back residential roads but high traffic roads running 50 MPH right alongside of other autos in some heavy traffic much of it on 4 lane undivided highway so I have been out there doing it.

what you fail to understand is that i have been riding for 30 years and used to do the same thing when i was young and dumb like you also.
i never had any major accident either but that doesnt make it safe.
keep rolling those dice and hopefully you wont loose because its gonna hurt if you do.
 

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Young and dumb hu, well if you want a pissing match I'm about 50, been riding for 20 some years and an ATV riding instructor for 15. I guess my problem is I just can't put up with bull and internet BS being passed around like it's the truth when it's not.

Just being alive is rolling the dice and riding an ATV in general is upping the roll.

Funny how lots of people out West are riding there ATV's on the roads but one guy thinks he is the authority on it. Wonder why numerous states are making it legal if it's so dangerous. Let me guess New York will never make it legal so it just shouldn't be legal anywhere else.
 

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lol..yea that's the way it is here in new york, even when i was rippin up the roads i didnt really like it and it was just to get to a destination.
i much more prefer to ride off road even back then,that's where these things shine.
ride the way you want muddy ..let er rip.
im just hoping to connect with new riders to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Gentlemen, we know there are two sides of this street legal debate, like there is on most issues. I'm glad we are articulating our views of the issue. There are sport riders and motocrossers who would never consider their ATVs for street use. There are farmers and ranchers who ride there ATVs on public secondary roads all the time and would never consider "stunt riding" on their machines, meaning high speed runs, wheelies, jumps or mud pits.

There are 70 pages of safety information in my 200 page user's manual for my new Outlander. I had to chuckle when I read on page 48 "the very nature of off road riding is dangerous". The paragraph goes on to discuss all the horribles that can happen riding off road. Can Am builds a "CE" model for sales into Europe. It comes equipped with street legal equipment like mirrors and turn signals, similar to a motorcycle.

I am scheduled to take the ATV safety training course this spring. I'll learn more about safe trail riding. If we developed a "drivers education" list of topics for trail riding instead of street riding, I bet it would be a longer list.

I tend to agree that off road is more dangerous than on road operation. Roads are designed to standards for vehicle operation, even the dirt roads around here. They are relatively smooth, wide, have gradual turns, good visibility, good road signs, etc. Off highway trails are rugged, have rocks and logs, rivers to cross, blind hills, and can be very steep here in Colorado.

You can get seriously hurt on an ATV on the road or on the trail. I submit it is the same danger as a motorcycle or scooter. ATVs are relatively slow moving and kinda tippy in turns. Street tires help on the road. There are many, many owners of ATVs who have no interest in street riding. Let freedom ring.

This "trail" is a dirt road in my neighborhood. I think it is safer than most of the trails I will ride this summer.

David
 

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For a someone new to ATV's in general I would recommend them staying off paved roads till they are familiar with the ATV. Basically treat it like they have never driven anything before, and practice on a quiet stretch of road to learn how the ATV handles.


Off-road these ATV's handle very well, the rear tires can slip allowing handling similar to a small car on flat ground.
On a paved road, an ATV looses this handling. The rear end is locked, meaning the ATV turns more like a large truck.
Due to the soft tires on an ATV, traction on pavement it very high making it extremely easy to oversteer with power steering.
Someone new to the sport can easily forget this.



For those of you mentioning you drive on very busy roads, that is perfectly fine with your 30+ years of experience. I believe Skeeter's point was, its not safe for someone to just jump on and do that with near 0 experience.
 
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