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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The OEM plastic skid panel under my Max 450 is standing up well. A few times it took a good hit and I thought sure it would get torn up but it survived intact. So my only beef with it so far is how much mud it brings home.
I am not against trying different stuff. Aluminum skid plates have been recommended here a few times. I might give one a try but would like to have some more info about the pros and cons before going ahead. Thanks for your attention.
 

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I won’t run my two XMRs without aftermarket Skids. I have Ricochet aluminum skids on both and would buy from them again....Pro is that it protects against rocks, sticks and anything else that you encounter riding...con is they can trap mud ...
 

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2021 renegade xmr 1000
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Can am aluminum skids are also quality. Picked up the rear for my bike, easy install. They hold mud, and get in the way of fluid changes but I wouldn't ride without em either.
 

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2021 Canam Outlander 1000 Max XTP
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There are no cons of having quality aluminum skids. Yes they hold mud but you can wash it right out. My machine doesn’t get damaged and I’ve hit rocks stumps and all kinds of stuff.
 

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2019 Outlander Max xt
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80 Posts
I would agree with Kusa there are no cons but the question is where you ride and do you need them if your riding soft dirt maybe bouncing over the odd rotten log you might be fine with the plastic, the ones we had on ours lasted maybe a few months and were destroyed I am sure the aluminum ones are taking a beating too. couple of picture in what we ride in

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I run the iron Baltic plastic version of the alum... can't remember the proper name... they are great, slide over things with ease... what can am puts on as a skid is a joke. I broke mine first ride by a well placed rock...

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Can am aluminum skid plates are awesome and take massive beatings from rocks/boulders plus recessed mounting so your not dragging bold ends over the rocks. I think aluminum wins for protection all around and less potential for frame and arm damages including differentials. It really depends where you ride, as others have suggested if your on dirt and typical wood trails without rocks and boulders then the plastic can am plates are just fine and do a good job.
 

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There's two camps here on Aluminum vs Plastic. What we refer to as plastic is actually HDPE (high density polyethylene) and UHMW (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene). My preference is the "plastic" UHMW. If you should decide on the "Plastic" pay attention to the material they use. HDPE is a cheaper material and a lot of the manufacturers opt for that, but there are some that use the UHMW.

UHMW (Ultra-High Molecular Weight) plastic is lightweight and provides a smooth and slick surface which helps your UTV glide over obstacles easier than Aluminum Skid Plates. The smooth surface of the UHMW layer greatly reduces the chances of getting 'Hung Up" on obstacles and is much quieter than Aluminum.

My impression was that the Plastic was a little more expensive that the Aluminum, but that would be subjective to the type and thickness of the material, but you would really need to price them both out.

To keep the price down we build our own skid plates using sheets of UHMW, and they have never failed us. ((146) Skid plat for 6x6 | Can-Am ATV Forum (can-amforum.com)

Difference Between UHMW and HDPE | Compare the Difference Between Similar Terms
 

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2020 Outlander XMR 1000r Max
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I run the aluminum Iron Baltic skid plates. I chose the aluminum plates because the tempuratures here in Alaska are so cold that plastic can break like glass. And I am a welder fabricator for both aluminum and steel. If per chance I ever damage the aluminum plates, I can easily fix it.
 

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2016 Can-Am Outlander Max XT 650
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I have aluminum skid plates and wouldn't ride without them since I encounter rocks all the time. The pros are full protection. One negligible cons is added weight. Not noticeable though I believe.
 
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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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268 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
A skid plate of any kind makes a lot of sense on any ATV. It is not a hard sell.
The question for me is which material plastic or aluminum, bearing in mind that there are different plastics and different aluminums.
In general I find all the plastic parts on my Outlander to be very good quality. The OEM plastic skid plate has stood up to some rough treatment so far but in temperatures above freezing. From the replies here, a switch to aluminum would only offer marginal benefits, if any, for the kind of riding I do. But temperatures do get down as far as -25 C here so I will hold the thought until after my first winter of riding.
Thanks to everyone who contributed.
 

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Outlander Max X-TP 1000T
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They hold mud, and get in the way of fluid changes but I wouldn't ride without em either.
I recently fitted a full set of Iron Baltic 10mm HDPE plastic skid plates and there was already a hole in them for access to the sump plug. I measured from that and put the hole saw through them where needed for the gearbox etc.
 

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Both aluminum and composite are great. Skids help. I have the Can Am composites on my outlander XMR and I have Can Am aluminum on my Renegade XMR. I love them both and they both do an excellent job. As for hard to change fluids, I cut holes in them under the front diff drain plug so I never have to remove them again. Removal of the fronts on a Renegade suck, PITA.

I've also had Ricochet aluminum skids on my first G1 Renegade and loved them too. Can Am are mandrel bent vs. welded so IMO they are better than the Ricochets.
 
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Every quad I ever owned I'd made my own one piece skid from alum or polyethylene as I'd never seen an ATV manufacturer put a decent skid plate on out of the box. However after receiving and examining my Outlander making a skid for it was absolutely needed but was just going to be much too involved for my liking with too many pieces needed.
Within a week or two of purchase I got the wallet out and installed Ricochet aluminum for the bash plate and main body. Just to be different tho, for the a-arms and swing arms I went with BRP's aluminum offerings due to theirs being abit lighter weight. I preferred the look of them as well over the Ricochet.
I took a coupla pics yesterday (after seeing the post and having some time), 7 years old now, plenty of wounds, well worth the price IMO. The drain acess holes for the engine oil and gearbox were already in place. Like said above, I find the majority of mud/dirt/debris will wash right out if you dont let it dry too long.

As a side note (in case you were wondering...), the black out line in the forward center section are the wear marks from my plow mount.

ricochet skid.jpg

ricochet skid.jpg2.jpg
 

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I guess that I'll throw my two cents in the ring. I've used both and both work great. As far as cons, aluminum is noisier, dents and kind of grabs onto rocks instead of slide compared to plastic. I haven't come up with any negatives with the plastic skids from can-am. I haven't cracked one and I like hoe they slide over rocks and stuff better. I ride in Alaska and havent seen any issue from cold. All of our snowmachines have plastic belly pans and cold doesn't seem to bother them. For my riding style and area I'll have to give the nod to the plastic skids. Like I said before, both have worked for us so maybe you can go by price or weight.
 

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I have run and bashed Aluminum Ricochet Skids on my 2014 since new and I will be putting them on my 2021. IMO I have watch video of all the other brands and by far the Ricochet Skids are the easiest and most durable and best bang for your buck period.
 

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I would agree with Kusa there are no cons but the question is where you ride and do you need them if your riding soft dirt maybe bouncing over the odd rotten log you might be fine with the plastic, the ones we had on ours lasted maybe a few months and were destroyed I am sure the aluminum ones are taking a beating too. couple of picture in what we ride in

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3.jpg All right, what is this. Who are you? Why did you post a picture of my driveway for all to see? (wink).
 
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