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2019 Outlander Max xt
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3.jpg All right, what is this. Who are you? Why did you post a picture of my driveway for all to see? (wink).
Sorry but your wife asked me to come up ;)
 
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2015 Can Am Outlander XT 650
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If you're wondering then YES, get proper skid plates. The stock ultra thin plastic ones barely do anything. I have the Ricochet aluminum ones and can still change out fluids while keeping the skids on. It makes a mess when it comes to draining the rear diff but I'm sure with some imagination and scrap plastic or aluminum foil you could avoid it. Skids holding mud and other debris is a problem but I typically clean my machine after any trip so it's never been a critical issue or damaged anything. I think the package said like 30 lbs when I got the full ricochet aluminum skid set in the mail so they're not crazy heavy.
 

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2012 Can Am Outlander 800r XT
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In most cases, people are spending $10,000.00 and up on new machines. It just doesn't make sense to me to protect metal with plastic. If plastic was so good, why aren't the frames of the machine made of it. Because it won't hold up. Don't cut corners to protect your investment, it just might be something you regret down the road. I have OEM aluminum covering it all, is it a pain, a little but worth every penny.
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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I have OEM aluminum covering it all, is it a pain, a little but worth every penny.
Would you please explain the pain?
I am looking at getting Can-Am aluminum skids if only because they come in separate pieces for the front, middle, rear and foot wells. Should this not make it easier to remove for maintenance?
 

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It just doesn't make sense to me to protect metal with plastic. If plastic was so good, why aren't the frames of the machine made of it. Because it won't hold up.
there will definitely never be a shortage of opinion and honestly I think there is no true single answer, but lots of opinion one way or the other is good for everyone! I agree with you to a point, but, I put your argument back to you for consideration: why do you protect steel with aluminum and why aren’t frames made from aluminum?

in a perfect world I would like 1/4 inch plate steel protecting my investment; but, 500lbs.
 

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By request, posting some pics on iron baltic plastic. I only have a few pictures of out of the box because too excited to get it installed…

Here is a comparison of stock front and rear a arms to the iron baltic plastic.

Rear
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front
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Here is the quality hardware with recess bolt heads
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some fresh install / recently installed pictures
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continued in next post…
 

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In my neck of the woods you can’t go anywhere without rock, stumps and logs; here’s some clips of where I ride.

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^ someone’s mid mount plow frame I found in a rocky area…

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^ because the internet feeds from cats…
And an extra gimme for internet gods
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one year later of definitely not babysitting the plastic skid plates to follow in next post
 

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One year in use in rough terrain
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Below pic is smoking a rock at like 50km/hr. It’s hard to tell, but the recessed washer is bent but the bolt head is still perfect.
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The last pictures show the most damage from bashing and sliding over rocks, and honestly this is nothing because it all on the sacrificial extra layer bash plate.

based on my experience, plastic holds up fantastic in heavy rock conditions. Lowest temp I drive is -15 Celsius.
 

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For what it’s worth, I chose the iron baltic plastic over the canam offerings for two reasons:

1. Based on the bullshit stock plastic protection that can am gave, I had zero confidence that can am understands what having skid plates mean.
2. The iron Baltic offers full footwell protection that wraps up and also provides protection to the side of the foot well (see pics). This has definitely saved me from broken plastic on large rocks
 

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For what it’s worth, I chose the iron baltic plastic over the canam offerings for two reasons:

1. Based on the bullshit stock plastic protection that can am gave, I had zero confidence that can am understands what having skid plates mean.
2. The iron Baltic offers full footwell protection that wraps up and also provides protection to the side of the foot well (see pics). This has definitely saved me from broken plastic on large rocks
Well I like them but, I can do the same and go out and take pictures of my 2014 that has Ricochet Aluminum since new with the same results. I believe that with the beatings these skids have taking they have save my frame big time, including the plowing I have done. But thanks to your pictures, please take note of the hard ware that it takes to mount your plates. I will try to take pictures of the hard ware from Ricochet to mount their Aluminum Skids. Bare in mind, I remove the rear skid plates every winter season to put on my Camso Track plates. This is done in minutes consisting of three bolts on the rear skid plate. Three on each side at the front. Like I said they are great looking plates, but way too much work to remove for the tracks. I have a 2021 coming and will be putting on Ricochet Aluminum Skids. It's a max frame so I will now have one extra bolt at the rear to contend with. I do like that fact they are black, so I'm thinking of ordering the Ricochet in black.
 

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2012 Can Am Outlander 800r XT
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Would you please explain the pain?
I am looking at getting Can-Am aluminum skids if only because they come in separate pieces for the front, middle, rear and foot wells. Should this not make it easier to remove for maintenance?
Little hard cleaning up after ride, nothing you can't handle.
 

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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Ah yes the cleaning......
I'm dreaming about a skid plate that works like a crumb tray on a toaster. Just slide it out, empty and slide it back in.
 

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2012 Can Am Outlander 800r XT
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there will definitely never be a shortage of opinion and honestly I think there is no true single answer, but lots of opinion one way or the other is good for everyone! I agree with you to a point, but, I put your argument back to you for consideration: why do you protect steel with aluminum and why aren’t frames made from aluminum?

in a perfect world I would like 1/4 inch plate steel protecting my investment; but, 500lbs.
True
 

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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·

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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Can am aluminum skid plates are awesome and take massive beatings from rocks/boulders plus recessed mounting so your not dragging bold ends over the rocks.
I am looking at getting Can-Am aluminum skids if only because they come in separate pieces for the front, middle, rear and foot wells. Should this not make it easier to remove for maintenance?
BBH (and/or anyone else), is it a fair assumption on my part that Can-Am aluminum skids being in sections would be easier to remove?

FWIW I just got done removing the OEM one piece plastic skid panel on my '21 max 450 and find it a royal chore to remove. It was removed just to see how much mud is left underneath from the usual hosing down after a ride. Even after taking considerable time to get in all the nooks and crannies with the hose but it is obvious that a considerable amount of accumulated mud is inaccessible unless the skid plate is removed. Too much mud in fact for me to overlook for long.
So in my case how easy a skid plate system is to remove and reinstall is a major criteria. And this without sacrificing protection.
 
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