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2021 outlander 850 MAX XTP
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I can't fully answer for hillsdweller, bit I know that we are suppose to clean the belt with soap and water to remove the gunk from the belt from when it was manufactured. Things like release agents, etc. We want to keep our belts clean and same with the sheaves. It is a great idea to replace your belt at home so you know that you have everything in your kit to do it. I also saw a couple simple mods that I did so I wouldn't have to remove my floorboard.
Nailed it !!!!馃憤馃憤馃憤
 

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What is the rational for this? My whole initial intention of putting it an ammo box was to keep it clean and not bouncing around and rubbing against things.
You might want to go for a long ride and check the temperature in your rear compartment under the rack we call them turkey cookers for a reason lol. Hate to see you ruin and good tent , I don鈥檛 think it gets that hot in there but I would use caution and keep an eye on it
 

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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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Lee, your post #18 sorta sums it up nicely.
Nevertheless may I share this answer just in from an expert who spent his whole career in the v-belt industry;

''The cvt belt on these machines are tough. Back bending the belt for storage is no problem. The radius of the back bend is not severe (referring to your photo Lee). The Kevlar cordes are designed to stretch as needed in use. Carbon fiber however is too brittle and cannot be bent backwards. If you remember the Buell motorcycle, it's drive belt had an idler pulley which bent the belt backwards. So carbon reinforced belts couldn鈥檛 be used.
I check my drive belt every year since 2013. The belt width is still within tolerance. I blow the grit off & reinstall the cover.''
 

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2021 Outlander 850 max XT-P
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Lee, your post #18 sorta sums it up nicely.
Nevertheless may I share this answer just in from an expert who spent his whole career in the v-belt industry;

''The cvt belt on these machines are tough. Back bending the belt for storage is no problem. The radius of the back bend is not severe (referring to your photo Lee). The Kevlar cordes are designed to stretch as needed in use. Carbon fiber however is too brittle and cannot be bent backwards. If you remember the Buell motorcycle, it's drive belt had an idler pulley which bent the belt backwards. So carbon reinforced belts couldn鈥檛 be used.
I check my drive belt every year since 2013. The belt width is still within tolerance. I blow the grit off & reinstall the cover.''
Interesting - maybe the kevlar in these belts is different than the kevlar we deal with at work. The stuff we deal with absolutely will not stretch - AT ALL period. Maybe there is different grades or something but...

Well maybe :unsure:
 

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I can't fully answer for hillsdweller, bit I know that we are suppose to clean the belt with soap and water to remove the gunk from the belt from when it was manufactured. Things like release agents, etc. We want to keep our belts clean and same with the sheaves. It is a great idea to replace your belt at home so you know that you have everything in your kit to do it. I also saw a couple simple mods that I did so I wouldn't have to remove my floorboard.
What are these tricks/mods you speak of to make this change easy. Also, you are speaking as in an Outlander to change the belt on, not renegade, right?

I would hate to have to change the belt in the woods at dark, cold. The lower bolts are a nightmare to get at even when using swivels. Dark and Cold trigger a different kind of paranoi in the woods especially knowing your "stuck" even when your Rambo.
 

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I think that the question of stretch referred to above is relative, kevlar compared to carbon fiber in a v-belt. Both have very low stretch when compared to nylon, polyester or polypropelene but it is there nontheless.
The stretch in a Kevlar cord is influenced by the construction of the cord (amount of twist, size of strand and heat treatment). Plus there are different types of kevlar and carbon fibre. So the kevlar in a v-belt would likely be different from the Kevlar in other applications.
The stuff we deal with absolutely will not stretch - AT ALL period.
I would be interested in hearing more about the kevlar you deal with from an academic point of view.
 

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I also saw a couple simple mods that I did so I wouldn't have to remove my floorboard.
I am also interested to hear more about this. Thanks in advance.
 

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2021 Outlander 850 max XT-P
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I think that the question of stretch referred to above is relative, kevlar compared to carbon fiber in a v-belt. Both have very low stretch when compared to nylon, polyester or polypropelene but it is there nontheless.
The stretch in a Kevlar cord is influenced by the construction of the cord (amount of twist, size of strand and heat treatment). Plus there are different types of kevlar and carbon fibre. So the kevlar in a v-belt would likely be different from the Kevlar in other applications.

I would be interested in hearing more about the kevlar you deal with from an academic point of view.
The kevlar we typically see is in fiber optic cabling. It's the strength member that surrounds the strands in a tight buffered cable. I'll try to post a picture - it's very fine usually yellow fibers, much like what you see in bullet proof vest and protective chainsaw chaps. It's crazy strong stuff. We have put this stuff though a unreal amount of abuse and never broken it- yes against best practice standards and specifications.

Sorry to side step the thread - picture to follow
 

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2014 Maverick 1000r
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You guys never cease to get a chuckle out of me :p

Y'all- it's a spare.belt. If you don't have an old used one yet, grab one of the $45 parts store gates, tie the thing in a knot, and forget it in the "turkey cooker" until such a time comes that you need it to get you back to the truck.

Unless you foresee the potential to completely clean your clutches of all the destroyed belt remains, while in the mud and miles back in the woods, and you're not going back to the truck, but rather say straight to a dyno shootout, and you're going to leave the backup belt on for the rest of its life, THEN be concerned about kevlar or carbon or shape or heat or cost or any of that, lol.

Don't over-think it ;)
 

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2018 Outlander 6x6
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What are these tricks/mods you speak of to make this change easy. Also, you are speaking as in an Outlander to change the belt on, not renegade, right?

I would hate to have to change the belt in the woods at dark, cold. The lower bolts are a nightmare to get at even when using swivels. Dark and Cold trigger a different kind of paranoi in the woods especially knowing your "stuck" even when your Rambo.
It isn't anything crazy, that's for sure. I remove the side panels using a push pin plier and small upholstery tool and or needle nosed plier. I have the can-am plastic skit plates on my machine so to make it easier to access two of the lower cover bolts, I trimmed a small area of footwell plastic (maybe a few inches in length and an inch-ish in width) so I can fit my 1/4" drive impact swivel and 8mm magnetic socket with long (8") extension and remove all of the bolts. The impact swivel or socket is key as they hold position better and don't bind like a standary chrome u-joint style. I agree that it's not super easy but it only takes about 10 minutes to remove the cover. Possibly quicker but I'm usually not in any hurry. I can then snake out the cover without loosing the bolts or moving the seal. I keep a long bolt for spreading the sheave and swap it out. I know these are specialty tools but easily available from any Matco Distributor or possibly Mac or Snappy. Having the right tools makes all of the difference working in tight areas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
You might want to go for a long ride and check the temperature in your rear compartment under the rack we call them turkey cookers for a reason lol. Hate to see you ruin and good tent , I don鈥檛 think it gets that hot in there but I would use caution and keep an eye on it
I don鈥檛 keep anything of real value in the turkey cooker. Only a well used tow strap and some cheap garbage recovery gear鈥.because it doesn鈥檛 lock! (and it gets filled with dirt and moisture.)

I often stash my bike in the woods and walk away from it to fish the honey holes, so everything stays locked up to keep the honest bandits honest.

I鈥檒l do a post someday of the crap I carry. It鈥檚 way overboard.

as for dark and cold; I grew up in the woods and have done more than enough no light recce parties to be concerned about that neck hair that raises now and then. Only twice in my 42 years have I ever felt truly spooked in the woods鈥nd neither one was much fun.

This is turning into some good knowledge on the topic!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
It isn't anything crazy, that's for sure. I remove the side panels using a push pin plier and small upholstery tool and or needle nosed plier. I have the can-am plastic skit plates on my machine so to make it easier to access two of the lower cover bolts, I trimmed a small area of footwell plastic (maybe a few inches in length and an inch-ish in width) so I can fit my 1/4" drive impact swivel and 8mm magnetic socket with long (8") extension and remove all of the bolts. The impact swivel or socket is key as they hold position better and don't bind like a standary chrome u-joint style. I agree that it's not super easy but it only takes about 10 minutes to remove the cover. Possibly quicker but I'm usually not in any hurry. I can then snake out the cover without loosing the bolts or moving the seal. I keep a long bolt for spreading the sheave and swap it out. I know these are specialty tools but easily available from any Matco Distributor or possibly Mac or Snappy. Having the right tools makes all of the difference working in tight areas.
This definitely isn鈥檛 happening with iron Baltic plates on I have to take the footwell plate off and the footwell, otherwise I end up inventing really creative combinations of potty mouth.
 

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2021 Outlander Max 450 DPS
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Thanks for the photos CMB. Makes sense that there be no twist in the kevlar fibres for that application. What is used to splice the kevlar end to end (glue, knots, ?)
How tight a bend can the FO cable tolerate?
Sorry if my curiosity is getting the better of me.
 

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I know it sounds crazy but some of us enjoy the details and don't get lost in the sauce. I certainly didn't mean to confuse anyone. Just stating a point of view. I guess the level of importance of what one feels is important is relative - I don't bend my belts backward - that's just one opinion.

@Tozguy
Most manufacturers specify 20x the cable dia. while under tension, 10x the cable dia while at rest. Corning has developed a "bend torrent" cable that breaks all the rules and still pass our certification. cool stuff.
 

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2018 Outlander 6x6
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This definitely isn鈥檛 happening with iron Baltic plates on I have to take the footwell plate off and the footwell, otherwise I end up inventing really creative combinations of potty mouth.
I also don't have to take my footwell plate off. That is what makes it so much easier. I did it once right when I bought my machine! Definetly a pain in the fanny. That's when I decided to come up with another method that was more doable, especially if I had to pull my cover off in the field.
 
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