Can-Am ATV Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hola amigos.
I'm Leland and I now live in Puerto Vallarta Mexico. Quads are street legal here but there are some gray areas to legality. I have the rack and rear trunk and mirrors. Now blinkers are another story. To most locals they are just a "suggestion" just as is the speed limit, street signs and road markings. Most drivers sort of make up their own driving laws as they go along. However just for the sake of safety and lessen the chances of being stopped I will be adding blinkers. Cops can be a pain in the ass here.
As far as the machine itself, it's great. Much easier to maneuver on the narrow streets of most small towns compared to my Tundra. Far better parking ability and it actually is a smoother ride on most streets than my truck. However is the heat. From the first of June to mid September the temp runs about 95 degrees with humidity at about 98%. I have found that running our Outland 1000 under 40kph creates a lot of heat. I try to stay above 40 and it really cools down between 55 and 65kph.
But living here, I just could't run it at night without adding a bit of "bling". So I have added a photo of our machine taken at dark.
As they say, "When in Mexico do as the Mexicans do."
We added LED lights. The lights are from Boogie Lights (5mm). They are wired into the headlight and come on when headlight come on. I put quick disconnects at the headlights, before the foot rests and after the foot rest. Easier to remove panels without worrying about the LEDS. I must say it does turn heads.
Leland
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
People will think your Can Am is nuclear powered! I just saw this thread you started. I would be so neat if I could ride on the streets here. And people don't drive so crazy which would help my confidence.

There are things you can do to help mitigate the exhaust heat on your left leg. I've done some of them and it seems to help. We don't have the temps or humidity that you folks do on the coast. You don't have snow storms either.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
What I find comical is guys say how unsafe it is to ride an ATV on the streets in the US but no one says anything about Mexico. If you think American drivers are crazy well in Mexico most traffic signs are just suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Street legal and tires

Running this quad in Mexico is great fun. There has been a few suggestions that I put 8 ply hard surface tires on. I have been giving this some consideration until we road to a town about 10 miles from were we live. The road surface getting there was fairly smooth as was the major highway, Highway 200. Once you leave the highway it turns into a whole other ball game. The streets are cobblestone. It's not cobblestone in the sense that we americans know and have seen. This cobblestone is river rock and sometimes big river rock set into concrete or sand. It is by no means smooth. there are small dips and then there are cannons. I started to watch the taxis that run these streets. Those cars are beat to death. I don't think there is a bolt that is no longer tight on any of them. The streets are rough and uneven let alone sometimes very narrow. Taking our Tundra into these small communities is sometimes not the best idea. It's just to big. There have been a few times now sense we brought down that I have actually put it in low and 4 wheel drive. At this point I think I'll leave the the tires on it that I have and see what becomes of them and how long they last. I just think that a hard surface tire would beat us to death as will as the quad. In seeing the quads that are there and have been there for some time, they are in good mechanical shape. Appearance wise...well that's a different story. Some of the locals beat them to death and of course it doesn't help when you pile ten people on one and then drive some of these streets at 30 and 40 mph.
You know I thought some of these trail riders were nuts but the driver in Mexico are insane. I just glad I'm retire and not in a hurry to get somewhere. Put a local behind the wheel (of any motorized vehicle) and the thought is they should have been there yesterday. It's nuts. :th_ATVsmiley:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
The most dangerous thing I did in my work career was a 4 hour taxi ride in central China. It was harrowing. Zipping along a poorly constructed 4 line road dodging pedestrians, bicycles, tractors, communist 1950s style trucks, open trenches in the road, and passing them all right in the headlights of oncoming traffic. It's like a big game of "chicken", who will dodge out of the way first. Yesterday's car wrecks were still along the side of the road. I assume no dead bodies inside, but who knows.

Italy is pretty harrowing too. So is Boston for that matter. A guy has got to learn the "driving culture" of an area. You are learning Mexico's, on an ATV yet.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Street legal

dbj216
Oh ya. The rule of the roads are quite different here. There are none. These people can turn a 4 lane highway (2 lanes each direction) into a six lane. Motorcycle and ate riders ride on the shoulder all the time. Being that atvs are bigger they are somewhat restricted to the lanes but if they want to get ahead the shoulder isn't off limits. The one thing an ate can do here is if they want to make a u turn in the middle of the highway they just jump the medium. The real advantage of an ate is parking. Like a motorcycle they will park anywhere and everywhere. If there is an inch of space they will park. Driving wise, we use stay in the right lane, do the speed limit and let other fly by. What's really confusing and it took some time to get used to was that to make a left turn you have to get off the highway on the right onto the lateral then get into the left lane to make a left turn that then crosses 4 lanes of traffic. Crazy. But ya we're learning. Blinkers....just a suggestion. If you use them to signal a lane change the drivers will speed up so you can't get in. Why you may ask? It's so you won't get in front of them and possible slow them down. However on the flip side, if you put on your 4 ways they will give you all the room in the world. The driving tactics and laws here would drive the lawmakers in the states nuts.

:th_ATVsmiley:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Tire advice-Street Legal in Mexico

Buenos días amigos:
There have been suggestions made to me by members of this group about changing out our tires on our 2017 Outlander 1000. As I have stated ATVs are street legal in Mexico. It has been suggest that I put on 8 ply hard surface tires. Not knowing anything about ATV tires, (or ATVs in general for that fact) I have some questions. Hope you guys can clear some things up for me.
1) Hard surface tires, are they solid rubber or do they take air? If they take air, what would the tire pressure be?
2) Were do I get these tires? Keep in mind I'm in Mexico so I'll have to search out a place here, but what I'm asking is do I go to a normal tire shop or an ATV dealer/parts house? I haven't checked the Can Am shop in Puerto Vallarta yet.
3) Will I have to change rims?
It has been suggest from ATVers living here that it is just the front tires that need to changed. Any thoughts?
Thanks for any advice about this.
Leland
:th_ATVsmiley:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
If you are just running around on streets with no offroad riding go to the tire store and find a small set of radial car tires to put on your rims. A lot of guys that ride the pavement around here do this.

I put these on my factory rims Ceros | Maxxis Tires USA. Seems a lot of guys in AZ are running these tires as they have great street life and do well in most conditions. I have run mine for 700 miles riding the roads and hard packed trails with very little wear, they have also served me well on muddy and snowy trails.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top