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Downhill ski helmets were Bush riding

  • Do you believe that a downhill ski helmet could be used for low-speed special application riding?

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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of putting together a specific kit for survival in the back country. The intention will be to make a "Rack Friendly" box similar to that which you would fit on the front of your quad only small enough to fit under the soft bag on your front rack. The plan is to leave it there where it will never be forgotten or left behind.

So with that out of the way I thought I would ask you all what some of your favourite items that you would not go with out in the back country ( I know...I know toilet paper :yahoo:). Seriously what would you not do with out in the event you were stuck in the night in the back country of Canada?

Any comments would be appreciated.
 

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Survival Kit

I have what I call my "Oh Sh*! bag". Goes with me everywhere. Yes, toilet paper is in it :th_smiliewoo:

*Fire starter
*Water filter and bottle
*Knife
*Med / first aid kit ( be sure to include any prescription meds! )
*50' of Cord
*Space blanket
*Signal mirror / whistle
*Granola bars
*Small pack of wet wipes
*Gum ( Amazing how much better fresh breath will make you feel )

Anything else you throw in will just be amenities and nice to have along.
 
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I've been toying with getting a pair of RotoPax one for fuel (red) and one for gear (black) which could mount to the front or rear rack and still throw something on top when necessary.
 

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A strike flint and a magnesium flint stick is a MUST!! Also, some kind of cup that you can boil water in!!

An Axe is a must in the woods of Canada. A Leatherman too.

Have you got a GPS??

(Thanks to many episodes of Survivorman, Thanks Les.)


I have what I call my "Oh Sh*! bag". Goes with me everywhere. Yes, toilet paper is in it :th_smiliewoo:

*Fire starter
*Water filter and bottle
*Knife
*Med / first aid kit ( be sure to include any prescription meds! )
*50' of Cord
*Space blanket
*Signal mirror / whistle
*Granola bars
*Small pack of wet wipes
*Gum ( Amazing how much better fresh breath will make you feel )

Anything else you throw in will just be amenities and nice to have along.
 
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Other stuff

Yep. Definitely have a number of other things with me on the Quad. My "Oh Sh*! bag" is just the bare minimum survival gear in a day pack that I can walk away from the quad with, if I am forced to hike out.
( I didn't list the exact types of items, such as the fire starter, water filter, etc., since the best stuff to take along is what's available in your area and what you are comfortable using. Kind of a personal choice thing...)
On my person is my ever present, always there, never left behind, Leatherman in a belt sheath. I also carry a good sheath / hunting knife on my belt as well as my ever trusty, ever ready, handgun and spare mag of ammo.
On the quad I have a hatchet, a machete, a tarp, a collapsible shovel, and an assorted tool bag, as well as a flat repair kit.
Remember to dress for the region / weather / temp. etc.,and DON'T leave the quad if you get stranded, unless it's obvious you don't have any other choice. Searchers will be able to track down and find the quad a lot easier than a person.
 
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Knowledge

Knowledge is your best weapon for survival. I highly recommend taking some sort of survival course, watch survival shows ( Survivorman, Man Vs. Wild, etc. ), check out survival vids on U-Tube, etc. Just do SOMETHING to increase your own knowledge on how to build shelters, start fires, find water, etc.
If you learn the basic tools to survive, you can adapt to any of the conditions you may someday find yourself unexpectedly facing.
MY riding partners have ( unfortunately?? ) become dependent on my knowledge, and don't seem to want to go riding unless I come along :yahoo:
 

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Knowledge is your best weapon for survival. I highly recommend taking some sort of survival course, watch survival shows ( Survivorman, Man Vs. Wild, etc. ), check out survival vids on U-Tube, etc. Just do SOMETHING to increase your own knowledge on how to build shelters, start fires, find water, etc.
If you learn the basic tools to survive, you can adapt to any of the conditions you may someday find yourself unexpectedly facing.
MY riding partners have ( unfortunately?? ) become dependent on my knowledge, and don't seem to want to go riding unless I come along :yahoo:

I recommend Survivor man, just because Les shows more details on building shelters, and fires. None of his stuff is rehearsed.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
My Thanks

This is great ...I think all of the feedback is perfect! I really like the ROTOPAX feedback. I will be useing them for the pack as I have neet been able to find exactly what I was looking for until now.... I have spend days looking for the right water tight boxes!:clapsmilie::th_smiliedance::yahoo:

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Most of my life I have spent on the rescue end of thing (EMS and Water Rescue). I am surprised at the differnt thought process I must take when I think of this subject. There is a bit of difference in beeing prepared to rescue your self as opposed to rescue for someone else. I think the old "it won't happen to me" concept slips in there. I am going to add these missing items you folks have suggested to my kit ... I do like the gum idea as well. Tree bark does not quite cut it I am afraid.
 

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I never rode under those circumstances before, but when we ride at the parks, I have my Streamlight SL-20XPled flashlight, a hatchet, small Gerber machete, my Gerber Multiplier, various tow straps, climbing carabiners (not those cheesy ones that say "not for climbing", the real ones) Several pairs of gloves of different types, I.E. work, thermal, mitten, Swiss army knife, few rolls of electrical tape, gutting knife..

Some of that stuff I keep in the carrier for my Camelbak since it has some good sized compartments that I can carry on my back, some stuff is in my pockets or on my belt, and the rest is in my Outty, either in the rear compartment or in one of my bags if I am using them. I also carry a few shotgun shells in my waders, since they have loops for them. I wouldnt need them where I ride, but they could be useful for many different things in other areas.
 
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Rotopax Storage

is rotopax storage units waterproof
I was really interested in these, until I couldn't find any information on them other than what is on the site. I looked at the Emergency Preparedness box ( it had more photos ) and they don't appear to be watertight. There isn't any kind of seal, just a lap-over lip.
I use military ammo cans. They come water resistant, but add a little weather stripping and they are completely waterproof. I like the fact they are metal, the lids lock down tight and they can even be locked with a padlock, if you put valuables in 'em.
I mount 'em to the rack using U bolts (nuts inside so they can't be easily removed), then seal the holes with silicone.
Of course, the Rotopax look to be a lot more user friendly. They are flat and they can be easily removed, if need be. Maybe a strip of weather seal around the inside lip?.....
 
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I will check to see how water tight they are. I just ordered them today so in a few I will be able to tell you. My big concern will be that they are not large enough. They are only 3 - 4 inches deep but ...well I will just wait untill I have them to comment.

Thanks for the input, I an getting quite a list of ideas ...thanks
 

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Hey guys.....all the stuff listed is obviously good to have.....but I won't go out without my Spot emergency transponder. I have already had to use it to helivac my buddy out of the bush after he rolled his SXS. We had a chopper with paramedic and 3 search and rescue volunteers there in about 40 minutes! It works and it could save your life.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
The spot idea is a great one, I had never heard of that. I will be doing some investigation to see if it is right for me but it sure looks good so far.

Thanks
 

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Electronics

The SPOT is definitely a good tool to throw in the survival tool box. A friend of mine has one and when we're out hunting for an extended period of time, it allows him to keep his wife informed ( it let's you send an "OK" kinda preprogrammed e-mail with the location), and it's a peace of mind thing knowing that you can call for help, if needed.
A GPS is a wonderful thing to take along as well. It helps, knowing where you are at any given time and with a "Back Track" feature, it may save you a lot of huntin' 'round for some familiar terrain feature.
Cell phones and radios can be life savers as well.
Of course, these ALL depend on hot batteries. And they ALL depend on getting a signal. Unfortunately, that may not be an option in some areas. Here in AK, SPOT and GPS may require climbing to the top of a mountain to get a signal. Cell phones and radios almost never have a signal in the Bush. ALL of these things eat up battery life trying to "find" a signal.
They are all great tools, but relying solely on them may be a death sentence.
I highly recommend taking an Orienteering Course ( learn to use a map and compass ) and know what the magnetic deviation is for the area you're in. I never let my Orienteering skills lapse. I do carry a GPS, a cell phone, and radios. But I don't let myself fall into a false sense of security because of them. Seems like every time I've needed to extricate myself from a situation, the electronics failed me ( Murphy's Law seems to be a strong force in my life :th_smiliepullhair: ).
 
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Fully agree with Oldakcop. Orienteering is a very good skill to have. Murphys Law Of Combat: The radios will faill 5 seconds into contact with the enemy. Maps do not die, nor do compasses. The more we rely on technology to save us, the more trouble we will get into.

Rule 1 Have a plan. Rule 2 Have a back up plan because the first one will probably fail.
 
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The SAS Survival Handbook. This book is good.

Your best thing is knowledge though. What you decide to do first is very important.

First, tell someone where you are going and when you are coming back
Next, what's the maximum reasonable time you think you need to survive?
Granola bars - saw that earlier
Gas line for siphoning fuel (fire)
Lighter - sealed up
Small tarp
Bungies you can use to attach the tarp easily
I almost always carry water
 
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